Yoiyama - Tourists and locals gather around to witness the beautifully illuminated hokos during Yoiyama.
Yoiyama - Tourists and locals gather around to witness the beautifully illuminated hokos during Yoiyama.
Kingyo-sukui - Kingyo-sukui (Goldfish scooping) is a traditional Japanese game in which a person scoops goldfish with a special scooper. A popular game during festivals in Japan.
Kingyo-sukui - Kingyo-sukui (Goldfish scooping) is a traditional Japanese game in which a person scoops goldfish with a special scooper. A popular game during festivals in Japan.
Super Ball Sukui - The super ball version of Kingyo-sukui.
Super Ball Sukui - The super ball version of Kingyo-sukui.
Ohayashi - Locals performing Ohayashi, traditional Japanese festival music.
Ohayashi - Locals performing Ohayashi, traditional Japanese festival music.
Hoko View - During the night festivals people can gain access to get up close and a view from the upper deck of a hoko.
Hoko View - During the night festivals people can gain access to get up close and a view from the upper deck of a hoko.
Yukata - My wife in a yukata, which is a casual summer kimono. A great way to enjoy the festivities.
Yukata - My wife in a yukata, which is a casual summer kimono. A great way to enjoy the festivities.
Yamaboko Junko - Standing up to 80 feet tall and weighing up to 12 tons, locals navigate the hokos through the streets of Kyoto during the Yamaboko Junko parade.
Yamaboko Junko - Standing up to 80 feet tall and weighing up to 12 tons, locals navigate the hokos through the streets of Kyoto during the Yamaboko Junko parade.
Tug of Hoko - Using strong and heavy rope, each hoko is pulled by 20 to 30 people through the Yamaboko Junko parade.
Tug of Hoko - Using strong and heavy rope, each hoko is pulled by 20 to 30 people through the Yamaboko Junko parade.
Balance - A couple men sit atop the hoko to prevent it from tipping over.
Balance - A couple men sit atop the hoko to prevent it from tipping over.
Foward - Two men stand at the front and use signals with an ogi (handheld fan) to navigate the hokos through the parade
Foward - Two men stand at the front and use signals with an ogi (handheld fan) to navigate the hokos through the parade

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